How do I know that I will not get placebo?

/How do I know that I will not get placebo?

How do I know that I will not get placebo?

A placebo (often called a sugar pill) is an agent that has no effect on the disease or patient, and is used in some clinical trials as a control/ comparator arm. These days many studies do not have a “placebo” arm, but rather a “standard of care” arm, meaning that patients that are assigned to the “standard of care” arm receive the available/approved treatment that is the standard care for their condition.
In an “open label” clinical trial both clinicians and patients know which treatment is being administered. In a “blind” or a “double blind” trial neither clinicians nor patients know which treatment is being administered. However, it’s important to note that even in blind trials patients are almost always offered, at the minimum, the current standard of care, meaning you will receive treatment while in trials. In trials where this is not the case (i.e., patients are not getting the standard treatment), the issue will be communicated to you by the trial coordinator/investigator.

2018-11-25T15:40:26+00:00
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